“Learning on the fly” or is this what they meant by the Agile Learning Model?

When Rapid Design for E Learning found its way into my vocabulary, I loved it and all the derivatives like rapid prototyping.  And soon, I starting seeing Agile this and Agile that.  It seemed that Agile was everywhere I looked.  When Michael Allen published his book, LEAVING ADDIE for SAM, I was intrigued and participated in an ATD (formerly known as ASTD) sponsored webinar.  It made a lot of sense to me and “I bought into the concept”.  Or so I thought …

 

A few weeks back, I joined a project that was already in-progress and had to “hit the ground running to get caught up to speed”.  The element of urgency was the anticipation of a post FDA visit following a consent decree.   If you’ve experienced this “scene” before, you can relate to the notion of expedited time.   As part of remediation efforts, training events needed to be conducted.  I learned during a meeting sometime my first week, I was to be the trainer.  Okay, given my background and experience, that made sense.  Sure, in a few weeks when we have the new procedure in place, I’d be happy to put the training materials together, is what I was thinking.  Wait – in two weeks?  Are you kidding me?  I’m not the SME and I don’t even have the software loaded on my laptop yet.  Well, some cleaned up version of those words was my response.

 

But what about all that buzz for rapid design and prototyping I’ve been reading about?  In theory, I totally bought it.  But, this is different I argued with myself.  This is compliance with a quality system for a company who is undergoing transformative change as a result of a consent decree!  I teach GMP Basics and conduct Annual GMP Refreshers several times a year and preach to audiences that you must follow the procedure otherwise it’s a deviation.  And in less than two weeks, I am expected to teach a process that is changing daily!   Yet on the other hand, how could I teach a work instruction that is known to be broken; is being re-designed and not yet finalized?  Stay tuned for a future blog about how I overcame this dilemma.

 

My bigger issue was to get out of my own design way.  I’m classically schooled in *ADDIE and with 25+ years as an instructional designer, very comfortable with how to design, develop and deliver training.  All I needed was more time and it hit me!  I was so focused on what I needed, that I was missing the urgency of the learners’ needs.  It was time to put theory into practice and take the agile plunge into the domain of the unknown.

 

By shifting the prioritization away from perfectly designed classes with pristine training materials, I was able to diagnose that the need was to get the learners into a live classroom.   They needed to see the database software in action and “play in the sandbox”; the training materials could follow afterwards.  I shifted my role to facilitator and found the true SMEs to navigate the software screens and explain how to complete field transactions.  To my surprise and delight, trainer-wannabes volunteered to paste screen shots into participant worksheets so they could take notes.  I became a scribe and worked on sequencing these pages for the next round of attendees.  Together, we all collaborated to meet the urgent need of the learners.   And we documented it!  Once they had the tour and sand-box time, the learners were paired up with a buddy for guided instruction of real entry into the live system.  The following week, the department was able to go live with a project plan that focused on a series of interim roles, changed roles and transitioning responsibilities within established roles.  The project launched on time to meet commitments promised to the agency.

 

It was energizing and empowering for the learners. A truly collaborative experience for the SMEs and the biggest surprise of all was that they thanked me.  Me?  I did not deliver the training; I was not the SME nor did I provide perfect training materials.   If I had pursued my classically trained ADDIE technique, we’d still be waiting to deliver those sessions.  However, I’m not ready to throw ADDIE over board yet.  She has served me well and continues to be an appropriate technique in most of my training needed situations.

 

My lesson learned was this: when the need is for speed and the design is not the key focus, I need to give up control to the SMEs and Learners and focus on facilitating the best learning experience given the daily change challenges and system constraints.   Is this “learning on the fly” or agile learning in practice?  You decide.

 

*NOTE: ADDIE = Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, Deliver – classic phases of Instructional Systems Design (ISD) Technique.

5 thoughts on ““Learning on the fly” or is this what they meant by the Agile Learning Model?”

  1. Very Interesting And Thank You For Sharing. In Our Current State Of The Pharmaceutical Balance There Is Always The Challenge Of Completing Quickly And Agressively. You Certainly Nailed The Need And Met The Eequirements And Expectations By Having The SME’S Directly Involved.

    1. Thank you for your feedback. I was hoping it would provide a perspective on how to navigate through our disruptive compliance world. And that Compliance Trainers can still be effective as facilitators. V-

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