What will it take to gain access to HPI/HPT Projects?

It’s more than a name change.
Adding Performance Consulting to your department name or position title sounds like a good idea at first. You know, help get the word out and ease into Performance Consulting projects, right? Well not exactly. Adding it on is exactly what happens; possible projects get added on to your workload and the “regular” training requests keep coming. It becomes a non-event. Dana Gaines Robinson and James C. Robinson, authors of Performance Consulting, strongly recommend that you create a strategic plan for your transition. And that’s exactly what I did in 1997.

Technical Training is now known as Performance Enhancement Dept.
But not without first discussing my plan with my boss and then pitching it to his staff at his weekly meeting. My plan included the need for the change and a comparison of the traditional training model and the performance model. In this comparison, I listed the percentages of training to consulting ratios and where the shift would occur. Training was never going away, but that we would do less and pick up more performance consulting work instead. I used the now familiar line – training is not always the answer. (Back then it was a very edgy statement.)

And I included in my pitch, the recommended pieces from the Robinsons’ seminal book: mission, vision, guiding principles, services, responsibilities and even who are customers were by percentages. Key to this plan and acceptance, was that we never said no to a training request, but re-framed it into why and how will we measure success. If we couldn’t design a measurement strategy from the beginning, we were obligated to turn the project down. And the General Manager agreed with that guiding principle.

NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS!
While we waited for feedback and project requests, I invited myself to a quality meeting about a GMP concern from a Line Trainer. When no one volunteered to complete a suggested task, I raised my hand and took the assignment. Cheers, we had our first project and we were now open for business. The task was then assigned to a direct report who thought I was crazy or evil, but I described how this assignment could catapult us into the limelight and showcase exactly the kind of performance work we were capable of doing. Intrigued but still doubtful, he took on the research task and I took on the rest of the project since I had the vision and could connect the dots. We got 3 more requests after we went public with our first project.

One of my best requests that first year was a request for Peer Mentoring. Oh did I want this project. I met with the requester and listened to his case. I researched the topic (remember this was 1997) and got some ideas about a possible solution. When I pressed on about measuring the success, he was vague and said, you know, as part of organizational awareness. I was in love with the topic and what it could mean for the operators and for the new PE department, but I could not find enough support to measure the success nor justify the time and resources to make it happen. We had to scrap the project request. This was the Evaluator Role coming out loud and clear. And this news got around fast. The PE department was not a dumping ground for someone else’s yearly objectives.

Okay, that’s great, but who does GMP Training?
During our success, we still managed the Compliance Training requirements as part of our agreement. Folks got so used to us and how we managed both the compliance side and performance enhancement requests, that we no longer had to explain what PE was and who we were. So upon biennial inspection from FDA, the inspector asked, “Well then, who does GMP Training”? So, I was asked to put Training back into our department name and become known as TPE: Training and Performance Enhancement which felt like we were back to square one. But the requests kept coming and the projects got much better.

My favorite project was the “Checking Policy”. It had everything going for it. Unfortunately for the company, a very expensive error was made by an operator and site leadership wanted him terminated. The GM who was our unofficial sponsor knew there was a better way to manage this and he needed to find the true root cause of the performance discrepancy, so he reached out to me. The rest of the story is long, so I’ll spare you the details, but three additional projects resulted from this request and all three included operators as my SME Team. This was unheard of at the time and really highlighted what an asset they were to the company despite the costly mistake. Turns out it wasn’t his fault, what a surprise!

Alas, the time came for me to leave that company and take on external consulting full time. When given the opportunity to reinvent myself once again years later, I reflected on the times when I was most engaged and excited about going to work. It was those Performance Enhancement projects that gave me such powerful examples of successfully aligning improvement projects with the business needs. But rather than do it again for one single company, I created HPIS Consulting instead so I could share the approach with more than one company.

So as this “Gaining Management Support” series concludes, I summarize all the related blogs with this final question and provide an overview as the answer.

What will it take?
Developing trust with business partners for starters. Ongoing skill development as an Analyst, a Change Manager, an Evaluator and of course, a Performance Solutions Specialist to build credibility. A good transition plan with vision for 1-3 years and tentative plans for year 4 and 5. And the courage to take projects no one else wants if you want to become a Performance Consultant bad enough. We did it and I’ve never been happier! -V

Gaining Management Series includes the following blog posts:

If the only tool in your toolbox is a hammer …
Are you worthy of your line partner’s trust?
Wanted: Seeking a business partner who has performance needs
First, make “friends” with line management

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