Are you doing the Training 2 Step?

Has this situation ever happened to you? You are in a root cause meeting and the *CAPA investigator is conducting an interview with the primary individual involved with the discrepancy. When questioned why did this happen, he shrugs first and then quietly mumbles I don’t know. When pushed further, he very slowly says I just kind of went brain dead for a moment.  And then silence.

While that may be the honest truth, the investigator must resist the temptation to label it as Operator Error and explore possible causes. One of my favorite root cause analysis tools for “I Don’t Know Why” response is to use the Fish Bone Diagram also known as the 4 M’s diagram. This tool provides a structured focus to explore many possibilities and not just stop at the first plausible cause; such as Operator Error. Aptly nicknamed, the 4 M’s are Man, Machine, Methods and Materials.   When the results of this exercise points to a training or operator related issue, don’t stop at “operator error –> retrain”.

Consider for a moment, what this retraining session would look like. Will re-reading the procedure be enough to “jog his memory”? Will repeating the procedure be a good use of precious time when s/he already knows what to do? More than likely it won’t prevent “going brain dead” from happening again. Instead, do the HPISC Training 2 Step:

Step 1 – confirm the results of the gap analysis

What task, what step(s) or actions are in question?

Step 2 – address why the original training did not transfer back to the job.

Using the 4 M’s diagram as the framework, explore Man, Machine, Methods and Materials questions with regards to the training this operator receives. See diagram below. The full set of questions can be found in the eBook Training Cause Analysis.

4msfortrca

Is this really worth it?

I think it is. Conducting these 2 steps will accomplish two objectives.   It will provide further evidence that some kind of training is needed. And it will highlight what areas are in need of revising either for the performer, the training program or course materials. Yet, there are some who will resist this added work because it’s easier to find blame than to uncover the cause. Fixing the true root cause could trigger a re-validation of the process or an FDA filing if it’s a major process change.   Why create more work? Isn’t it easier to just retrain ‘em? No, not really. Finding the true root cause is the only effective way of eliminating many of the costly, recurring problems that can plague manufacturers.

But what if

Some folks will push back with the excuse – “this never caused a problem until now”, so it must be the operator’s fault! This may be the first time it was discovered but that does not mean the procedure is 100% accurate. Often, experienced operators know how to work around an incorrect step and don’t always report a misstep in the procedure while a less savvy operator follows the procedure and causes the non-conformance to occur. See Sidebar SOP Logic Rules. Is the procedure difficult, lengthy or requires weeks to become proficient let alone qualified? Was the qualification routine or performed as a simulation? Was the procedure written with support from a lead operator or qualified trainer? Did the draft version undergo some kind of field test or dry run prior to release? And the classic situation, are proposed changes hung up in change control awaiting effective release?screen-shot-2016-10-19-at-4-33-39-pm

Understanding Why Human Errors Occur

Industry practice is evolving to explore why people make the decisions they do by looking at the Organization’s systems. It’s usually a poor decision made somewhere in the error chain. We must believe that the person who made the poor decision did not intend for the error to occur. As part of CAPA investigations, we need to explore their physical environment as well; the conditions under which they make those decisions. The Training Program Improvement Checklist can be requested using this link to capture your findings.

If you are going to spend time and money on training, at least identify what the gap is; fix that and then “train” or provide awareness on what was corrected to prevent the issue from re-occurring again.   That is after all, the intention of *Corrective Action Preventive Action investigations. -VB

You may to explore these other library gems:

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Why the Band Aids Keep Falling Off

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