When Your GXP Learning Provider Becomes Your Strategic Partner

“So, they want me to ask if you would do the GMP refresher for us.”

“No.  I did the GMP Basics last year.  It’s only been 4 months and I am not going to repeat the content or water it down or “just tell them the GMPs”. 

“Well, I can’t do it by myself, not after you’ve introduced us to activities.  I don’t know how to create meaningful exercises.”

“Let me think about this some more.  What’s currently happening on site, other than last year’s 483? Do you have any updates we can use?”

“Oh, there was an audit done and you know they found stuff.  Folks are kind of hot about it, actually.”

“Okay, now we have something to work with.  I’ll do it on two conditions.  1.) That we use the audit observations and 2.) I need 90 minutes.”

“Nope, not going to happen.  No way for the 90 minutes. Oh, and they want to keep the audit observations ‘confidential’.  We’re not allowed to use them.”

“Then you’ll have to find another consultant to do it. After the training we did last year, I cannot go back to lecture only.  I built trust with your employees.  And you and I learned that we need to add time so that they can complete the quiz at the end and not feel rushed”. 

“I really want you to do it.  I will go back to the management team and tell them you said yes. But I need a proposal justifying the 90 minutes and describing what you will do with audit observations.”

The Quality of Previous Learning Provider Engagements

This organization is a leading manufacturer and distributor of regulated products.  They received Form FD-483 observations the year before.  Among the remedial actions, was a “Back to GMP Basics” training program for the entire site including indirect support and non-GMP staff.   

Not only were sessions content tailored for varying roles, but employees were also introduced to interactive exercises and collaborative activities that encouraged them to share responses with their seatmates.  For many of them, this was a totally different GMP learning experience.  Employees were no longer grumbling about the training and management was able to produce the required paperwork to the agency. 

As part of the remediation plan, the client also pledged to increase the frequency of GMP refreshers to twice a year.  Given the favorable outcome from the previous GMP Training program, it was suitable that the management team extended an offer to conduct a refresher.  What was a surprise, however, was that the management team wanted their old – “gloom and doom, thou shall follow these regulations” style of telling them the GMPs from the podium.  Why? Was this a form of punishment?  It sure felt like it.

Management Team Knew Their Priority

At the time of the above request, 4 months of the year had already transpired.  During which, a follow-up audit of their GMP systems was conducted by a separate consulting group.  The audit found numerous examples of recent noncompliance.  The site leadership team was also reminded that the 1st GMP refresher was coming due.  The head of Quality made the decision to use the GMP refresher as a corrective action for the audit.

Kudos to the Head of Quality for doing three things.  First, he recognized that the c in CGMPs was the audit findings and resulting noncompliance examples.  Two, he leveraged the resource of QA Training and demonstrated just how strategic the role should be to the organization by elevating the importance of this refresher.  He used a systems approach when he tagged the delivery of this refresher to the corrective actions for the independent audit.  This was quite novel at the time.  And third, he approved the request to provide his Training Manager some help. He connected all the dots between the independent solos!

Their Decision to Outsource

Their “GMP Trainer” was also the manager of the company-wide training database.  He was a department of one whose primary duty was data entry into a complicated and non-user-friendly training database.  Time to develop and deliver the GMP refresher was something this manager did not have.  The sooner it could be delivered, the sooner the training manager could get back to the mounting stacks of attendance records awaiting data entry.

 “Just tell them the GMPs” one more time is what the management team was originally asking for.  The learners were expected to sit and listen.  After all, they used to be scolded for poor compliance results. One employee referred to it as “shame and blame” sessions with their heads down to avoid eye contact with the presenter; especially if it was a leader from Quality Operations.

The management team wanted to bring back their learning provider and they wanted to dictate how the refresher would be conducted.  To revert to lectures only would break the trust the learners had built with the GMP Learning Provider and jeopardize any successful transfer of behavior change to the workplace.

Corrective Actions are supposed to remediate, right?

The independent audit revealed several examples of non-compliant actions taken.  When categorized, these actions clustered around three main areas.  If the “corrective actions training” aka the GMP refresher was going to remediate these findings, just telling them what the regs say without any discussion or collaborative processing of what these examples were showing, would have no effect on eliminating or reducing further GMP “mistakes”.  What did the management team expect to happen because of the training?  I imagine no more examples of GMP violations?  

Aligning Business Needs with Quality Objectives Yield a Strategic Focus

Shifting the behavior towards appropriate compliance begins with shifting mindsets around compliance.  Working with the three categorized areas, the management team agreed to the following three business outcomes:

  1. Continued commitment to comply with our GMP Work Habits
  2. Follow Good Documentation Practices for our controlled documents
  3. Perform our responsibilities for operating equipment in our work areas

While these outcomes were great goals, they were also very broad and hard for learners to put into daily practice; let alone change their behavior.  Effectiveness checks for training was another commitment to the agency as part of the GMP Training program improvements.

Furthermore, measuring the effectiveness of the GMP refresher training would require more than a knowledge check if behavior change back at the workplace was their end game.  What would the CAPA effectiveness checks look like for this corrective action as well? Recall, the two quality system activities were now interlinked.

In further discussions with the Head of Quality, the business outcomes were transcribed into quality themes and key messages.  These then drove the decisions for specific content pieces and activities that targeted what compliant behavior should look like regarding the 3 quality themes. 

To further quell any negative ramifications using audit findings, the chosen examples were approved by the Head of Quality and a courtesy copy of the refresher materials was provided to the management team in advance. 

Designing, developing, and delivering the refresher course topics with even more interactive opportunities all the while ensuring that the previous GMP Basics content was refreshed, not just repeated, became the basis for the activities.  It was analogous to “a Part 2” in which employees were allowed to “interact” with both the regulations and real-time scenarios (selective audit observations). 

When a Learning Partnership Works

One of the advantages of working with a previous learning provider is the ability to create an ongoing learning path built upon previously delivered content; not just provide a “canned” presentation on the requested topic.  There is a willingness to work with internal resources and integrate existing artifacts such as audit findings into the course design so that the organization achieves its business outcomes beyond just closing the CAPAs and getting a checkmark for delivering the first of two promised refreshers. 

Value and Impact: Training Effectiveness Results

  • Assembling into pairs and groups was achieved in less time than when first introduced in the GMP Basics series.  The Learning Provider now had credibility and the employee’s earned trust. The relevance of the audit finding examples kept employees engaged with many of them asking private questions at the end of the sessions.  This was unheard of previously, thus initiating the “transfer back to my job”.  They were thinking about how these examples and the GMP content applied to them.
  • A 5-question quiz was administered as part of their effectiveness training check.  This is the classic tool for knowledge comprehension and their newly revised SOP now included Knowledge Checks (KCs) for GMP Training.  400+ employees completed the quiz.  The mean score was 91% with several achieving 100% and a few failing scores.

Why Knowledge Checks Don’t Tell the Whole Story …

Using an item analysis can reveal a lot of information about the construction of the GMP KC questions.

As always, it is possible that some memorization and sharing the correct lettered responses happen despite that there were three versions of the KC.  It is also possible that some folks do not take the time to read questions thoroughly.  And some folks don’t recognize when “all of the above” choice applies.  They are in a rush to exit the class. 

Pay attention to incorrect responses that are clearly wrong as in they don’t make sense.  It may indicate a “cheating trend” if only one version of a quiz is provided.  In this case, three versions of the quiz were used.

When responses are troubling; a follow-up discussion with an SME or a “legacy” employee is needed to determine if an old, outdated, and non-GMP practice was acceptable at one time.  Knowing this gives some insight into why it was chosen but disheartening that the behavior is still prevalent.  If the behavior is still happening, it warrants further discussions with site leadership and the Head of Quality.  It may be isolated to a few individuals and can be managed via the HR performance management system.

Sometimes verbal responses to a question in class, don’t match the chosen response in the quiz.  The quiz results could be a matter of confusion with the wording of the question especially for Assessment A in which the question had a NOT worded in it, rendering the answer to be False.  It’s akin to a double negative and it trips up a lot of people who are not test-savvy.  So be careful with questions that can be confusing or tricky.  For this client, it was worded to capture a real scenario that happens in the industry. 

This client was urged to address failing scores; results below 80%.  Their Training SOP had recently been revised to include formal assessments for GMP Training and Critical Task SOPs as part of their effectiveness checks for training.

  • The priority for the refresher was agreed to by the site management team and communicated to everyone during the sessions.  The FDA remediation plan was still a focused site objective, and this refresher was part of those activities; not something in addition to like an after-thought or add-on.
    • Three outcomes were identified as the business needs and became the driver behind content and decisions for activities. The “Big Why” for this refresher was clear and compelling.  Tangible work-behaviors were user-generated for peers to model as examples of complying with the GMP Work Habits.
    • There was continuity with previous GMP content.  The existing GMP Learning Provider connected the dots with prior content and reinforced the relevancy and importance of the GMP Work Habits.  Rapport was re-established and on-going trust for an engaging and interactive session of 90 minutes was achieved.  Minimal repeat of previous content; refresh enough to complete an activity.
  • Learning Provider negotiated with Site Management Team on behalf of the Learners Needs: to include real workplace audit observations and an additional 30 minutes of classroom time that included the GMP quiz and debrief of the correct answers. Employees left each session with the correct responses to 5 questions; their final take away from the sessions.
  • The design followed a 3-step learning model: Learn, Experience, Apply. 
    • Learn: Short lectures or vignettes was used to learn/refresh on content. 
    • Experience: Variety of ways in which the Learners engaged with the audit observations; not just a slide for each observation but small group discussion and tangible activity to complete and report back on.
    • Apply: peer feedback, debriefing.

Are you thinking about outsourcing your next compliance?  Why not form a training partnership with an industry GXP Learning Provider?  -VB

Like this blog? Tell Vivian.

HPISC eGuidebooks are available.

When to Outsource Your GMP Refresher

Tips for Writing KCs

Tips for Writing Knowledge Checks

              

About Vivian Bringslimark, President of HPIS Consulting, Inc.

Looking for more resources for GXP Training? Visit the GXP Training Menu Page.

Need to build a refresher or overhaul your GMP Basics Program?

(c) HPIS Consulting, Inc.

Wanted: Seeking a business partner who has performance needs

Alan Weiss in his book, Organizational Consulting: How to be an effective internal change agent, recommends that internal consultants avoid what he calls the IRS syndrome – “I’m from the IRS and I’m here to help you”.  Just because you may be an expert in training and are “schooled” in HPI/HPT (Human Performance Technology); you don’t need to alienate your internal customers. 

You want to gain credibility in order to be accepted as a peer and earn their trust.  It’s easy to play it safe and agree with their current point of view when seeking acceptance with a new internal customer.  Contrary to how to win and keep friends, you may need to take an unpopular viewpoint on an issue you feel strongly about.  But don’t just show up only when there is a problem and declare “gotcha” or “I told you so”. 

10 Ways to Earn Trust with Your Client

First You Need To Make Friends With Line Management

One of the best ways to establish a business partner working relationship is to start with line management while you are waiting for your first HPI (Human Performance Improvement) project or during project downtimes.  Spend some time getting to know the folks you are most likely to be engaging with for a future project.   

While the relationship is forming, both parties can begin to share information about each other’s area of responsibilities.  The Performance Consultant (PC) learns more about the manager’s department: work processes that are not robust; performance needs that are both urgent and ongoing and tied to “important” performance requirements.  These could be ideas for improvement. 

During the dialogue, listen for internal challenges such as:

  • supplier snafus,
  • resource-constrained hick-ups,
  • conflicting policies and procedures and
  • other projects that are resulting in more to-do’s. 

Find out if they are also managing regulatory commitments and working on closing out CAPAs and deviations related to training, performance issues, or “Operator Error” mistakes.  These are possible sources of entry points that can move the relationship to potential partner status.  However, be mindful of finding the right balance between suggesting ideas and showcasing your “brilliant” concepts.

Partnering Implies A Two Way Exchange

The PC also shares information about HPI/ HPT (Human Performance Improvement/Technology) at a level of depth that matches the individual’s interest and needs at the time.  Remember, while your goal is to educate them about HPI, you don’t want to lecture to them or overwhelm them with even more tasks for their workload.  According to Mary Board, author of Beyond Transfer of Training: Engaging Systems to Improve Performance; the PC is striving to build a close working relationship that over time can lead to more strategic performance improvement work.  It is not only about getting projects. 

Moving the Relationship to Partner Status

Requests for help/support are bound to surface. To demonstrate support and strengthen the desire to partner, a PC can follow up on discussions by sending additional literary sources such as articles, white papers, and blogs from industry thought leaders.  Another popular activity is to pitch in to help meet a deadline or rebalance their workload.  Mini-projects are certain to follow, next.  It is an excellent way to move the relationship to partner status. 

Keep in mind; however, that it is a JOINT undertaking and not a delegation of tasks to a direct report or a hired temporary employee.  This is where the consulting side of the partnership can begin; leading him/her through decisions and actions using the HPI methodology says Broad. Early conversations around partnering should include:

  • purpose of working together
  • benefits of shared tasks shared outcomes
  • role clarification
  • partnering process explanation and agreement.

Three Consulting Styles

Let’s start with the Pair of HandsThis style of consulting resembles more or less the contractor for hire or long-term temporary employee; sometimes referred to as the permanent temp much to the chagrin of those who hold those positions.  Here the client (or internal customer) retains control of the project from problem identification to solution deployment.  The consultant implements those decisions as if s/he were an extension of the client’s staff.  Hence the expression, an extra pair of hands to delegate the work to.

Three Types of Consulting Styles

There’s the Expert.  Here the consultant assumes most of the control for the project.  The client can still make suggestions while the consultant makes recommendations for the best solution selection.  Ultimately, the expert-consultant decides on the course of action and tells the client what the best path forward.  In this type of consulting relationship, the client wants the expertise of the consultant. 

The third is Collaborator.  This is where the consultant utilizes his/her specialized knowledge and field experience and leverages the client’s knowledge of the operations, including processes and procedures, and the cultural factors.  In this relationship style,  1 + 1 = 3, representing a more synergistic approach to problem solving.  Decisions and implementation plans become shared responsibilities.  This style is often referred to as a business partnership and it is really the only one that changes performance.

The Best Time to Initiate

Ideally, the best time to initiate a relationship is during a current assignment especially when the shared project is going well.   A “project client” is no less important than a business partner, the difference is in the intensity during the life of the project.  A project client is the one who is ultimately accountable for the project results and may not be the one who initiates the project discussion, explains Dana Gaines Robinson and James C. Robinson in their book, Strategic Business Partner: Aligning people strategies with business goals

Before you can get access to strategic work, a PC has to prove s/he can deliver on tactical projects that are solution-oriented.  Gaining access starts with cultivating a relationship with project clients.  The secret is not to ignore or bypass the project contact person but to work with him/her to gain access to the project client. 

Suggest that the contact/lead attends meetings with you regarding issues that need to be resolved at the higher level or collaborate on joint update briefings to the leadership team.  By establishing good relations with the contact, access to the project client is less adversarial and demonstrates an authentic approach to getting answers/ direction that was not previously available. 

Project clients can become business partners; one that provides access to strategic initiatives.  Or they can provide introductions to true clients.  If possible, volunteer for activities that will give you visibility with this person while supporting him/her on the assigned project.  They will begin to learn more about your “other” capabilities and your ability to handle more than “assignment at a time” will be confirmed.  And in all your interactions, ensure that they are truly value-added conversations; else you will be perceived as wasting a busy executive’s time.   

Internal vs. External Consultant

I’ve been both and have had success in implementing HPI projects in both environments.  There are pros and cons and tradeoffs.  Whether you are internal to the organization or external (an outsider), Compliance Trainers need to expand their skills sets if they are going to move from a “pair of hands” to expert and eventually to trusted business partner. 

Technical Trainer or Performance Consultant Wanna-be?

As the traditional role of technical trainer evolves into Performance Consultant, the skills needed are evolving as well to keep up with management expectations for alignment with business needs.  To that end, Beverly Scott, author of Consulting on the Inside: An internal consultant’s guide to living and working inside organizations, suggests that internal consultants re-tool with some new skill sets:

  1. Know the business.  Tie solutions and align results to real business issues that add value. Get to know finances.
  2. Identify performance gaps before management does or becomes the focus of a CAPA corrective action.
  3. Become a systems thinker.  HPI is all about systematic performance improvement.
  4. Build skills for the multiple roles a PC performs.  Become known as a change agent, systems thinker, learning strategist.
  5. Pay attention to trends; talk about them.  Watch for relevance for the organization. –VB.

“The ability to give advice as a consultant comes from trust and respect, which are rooted in the relationship”. (Beverly Scott, p.61, 2000).

  • Beverly Scott Consulting on the Inside: An internal consultant’s guide to living and working inside organizations.
  • Dana Gaines Robinson and James C. Robinson in their book, Strategic Business Partner: Aligning people strategies with business goals
  • Alan WeissOrganizational Consulting: How to be an effective internal change agent.

Who is the Author, Vivian Bringslimark?

Comments welcomed, feedback appreciated.

Like this blog? Subscribe to Theory vs Blog | navigate to the left sidebar and click Subscribe Button.

Need to move your trainer relationship to business partner status? I can help.

More Performance Consulting Blogs available

(c) HPIS Consulting, Inc.

Taking the Agile Learning Plunge

When Rapid Design for eLearning found its way into my vocabulary, I loved it and all the derivatives like rapid prototyping, etc.  And soon, I started seeing agile this and agile that.  It seemed that agile was everywhere I looked.  When Michael Allen published his book, LEAVING ADDIE for SAM, I was intrigued and participated in an ATD sponsored webinar.  It made a lot of sense to me and “I bought into the concept”.  Or so I thought …

I joined a project that was already in-progress and had to “hit the ground running to get caught up to speed”.  The element of urgency was the anticipation of a post FDA visit following a consent decree.   If you’ve experienced this “scene” before, you can relate to the notion of expedited time.   As part of remediation efforts, training events needed to be conducted.  I learned during a meeting sometime my first week, I was to be the trainer.  Okay, given my instructional design background and classroom facilitation experience, that made sense.  Sure, in a few weeks when we have the new procedure in place, I’d be happy to put the training materials together, is what I was thinking.  Wait, what, in two weeks?  Are you kidding me?  I’m not the SME and I don’t even have the software loaded on my laptop yet.  Well, some cleaned up version of those words was my response.

My biggest challenge was to get out of my own design way

I’m classically schooled in *ADDIE with 30+ years as an instructional designer and very comfortable with how to design, develop and deliver training.  All I needed was more time; more than two weeks, for a process that was changing daily!   And then I found myself thinking about all the buzz for rapid design and prototyping I had been reading about.  

*ADDIE = Analysis, Design, Develop, Implement, Evaluate: a project management approach to training projects.

In theory, I totally bought into it. But this is different I argued with myself.  This is compliance with a quality system for a company that is undergoing transformative change as a result of a consent decree!  Furthermore, I teach GMP Basics and conduct Annual GMP Refreshers several times a year. My GMP dilemma challenged the very essence of my “learned” compliance beliefs about following the 1st basic GMP Work Habit – “thou shall follow written procedures” otherwise, it’s a deviation. 

Are we really planning to deviate from the SOP while under a consent decree?

While it was the intention of the business unit leader to deviate from the approved set of work instructions, a planned deviation would not be appropriate in this case.  I mean we were talking about a corrective action for a consent decree item.  Were we really considering a PLANNED DEVIATION to intentionally teach unapproved procedures and then submit the documentation as a completed corrective action for the CAPA to the agency?  I was truly baffled by how I was going to pull this off in two weeks.  I’m not a magician, I can’t pull this rabbit out of my laptop is what I was thinking when I left the VP’s office.

Yet on the other hand, how could I teach a work instruction that was known to be broken; was being re-designed and not yet finalized?  The instructional designer side of me screamed – how can you teach flawed content?  That’s wasted training that results in scrap learning. How is that training going to be effective not to mention having to explain a failed effectiveness check during the post inspection?

And then, it hit me!  I was so focused on WHAT I NEEDED, that I was missing the urgency of the learners’ needs. Julia Lewis Satov refers to this situation as ‘agility by fire’ – “the ability to move quickly but not easily, and still excel”, (p. 50, 2020). It was time to put theory into practice and take the agile learning plunge into the realm of the unknown.  If I could come up with a way to document what we were doing and get it approved, then I could reconcile my GMP dilemma and satisfy my instructional designer. 

 With a little help from my validation colleagues – the training implementation plan

Validation engineers use protocols to capture their “change in process” work.  Whether it’s experimental batches, 3 batches for process validation or **IQ-OQ-PQ protocols for equipment qualifications.  They are validating the procedure or the new process before it can become the standard operating procedure by developing the plan, developing acceptance criteria, managing deviations and capturing the results.  So why couldn’t I borrow the concept and adapt it to my situation?

**Installation Qualification, Operational Qualification, Performance Qualification

The purpose of the initial training session was to test the new sequence of steps and confirm the robustness of the software responses for each field entry and then make correct decisions where needed.  The learners were still in compliance with the quality policy for complaint handling and were still meeting the intention for Medical Device Reporting requirements.  They were essentially testing the future “how-to steps” for the proposed new work instructions.

Agile QT’s processing their learning experience

I did not copy and paste the validation protocol template. I did, however, include a please pardon our appearance while we are under construction” paragraph in the training plan to document the departure from the current set of work instructions.  This protocol-like section also included our intentions for the outcomes of the sessions. We also stipulated that required SOP training of all affected users including the Qualified Trainers, would be mandatory once the finalized set of work instructions were approved.

Anybody want to play in the sand-box?

By shifting the prioritization away from perfectly designed classes with pristine training materials, I was able to diagnose that the need was to get the learners into a live classroom. But first I needed a small group of super users who wanted to see the database software in action and “play in the sandbox”; the training materials could follow afterwards. 

It didn’t take long for them to find me.  These “learning-agile individuals” wanted the challenge of not only learning something new but seemed to thrive on the idea that they would be managing their part of the training implementation plan.  They were not at all worried about the lack of available training materials for themselves.  They allowed the learning experience to occur spontaneously.  Their ability to learn new knowledge and skills did not get in the way of previously learned skills. They embraced the changes rather than resist them.

A new breed of SMEs as Agile Qualified Trainers?

I shifted my role to facilitator and allowed these learning agile SMEs to navigate the software screens and then work out the explanation of how to complete field transactions.  In the Center for Creative Leadership “Learning Agility” white paper, authors Adam Mitchinson and Robert Morris explain that learning-agile individuals understand that experience alone does not guarantee learning; they take time to reflect, seeking to understand why things happen, in addition to what happened”, p. 2.

“SMEs are true front-line and onsite educators” says Satov.  Every organization has employees who are brimming with intelligent and diverse ideas and are eager to share their talent producing work deliverables. “[…] Our focus must shift to finding and developing individuals who are continually able to give up skills, perspectives, and ideas that are no longer relevant, and learn new ones that are”, (Mitchinson and Morris, 2014, p.1).

We documented these sessions as training because we all learned how to navigate the screens; albeit it was learning on the fly.  We recognized that learning the software was the goal.  Developing the process steps and eventually the work instructions was the secondary goal.  This training documentation became the qualifying evidence for their train-the-trainer knowledge transfer.  And collectively they decided what choices end users were to pick from the drop down tables.  

Is this “learning on the fly” or agile learning in practice? You decide.

1 + 1+ 1 is more than 3

I shifted my role again to become a scribe and worked on sequencing these pages for the next round of end-users. To my surprise and delight, my new breed of Agile QTs volunteered to paste screen shots into participant worksheets so their “students” could take additional notes.  Together, we all collaborated to meet the urgent need of the end-users. Each of us in our niche roles experienced first-hand the value the others brought with them to that room.  And in that time away from our regular job tasks, we became more valuable to the organization.

The learners were paired up with their Agile QT for guided instruction of real entry into the live system.  The following week, the department was able to go live with a project plan that focused on a series of interim roles, changed roles and transitioning responsibilities within established roles.  The project launched on time to meet commitments promised to the agency.

Why are they thanking me?

It was an energizing and empowering learning experience for the super-users. A truly collaborative experience for the SMEs and the biggest surprise of all was that they thanked me.  Me?  I did not deliver the training; I was not the SME, nor did I provide perfect training materials.   If I had pursued my classically trained ADDIE approach, we would have waited for the perfect SOP to deliver those sessions and woefully miss FDA committed timelines. While I’m not ready to throw ADDIE overboard yet, Satov makes a compelling plea, “move aside elite and long-standing establishments of formal education”. 

My lesson learned was this: when the demand is for speed and the content design is not the key focus, I need to give up control to the true onsite educators and focus on facilitating the best learning experience given the daily change challenges and system constraints. Satov would agree, “the role of learning is to capitalize and create the architecture of the hybrid-mind”.  Is this “learning on the fly” or agile learning in practice?  You decide. But agile instructional design is here to stay if QA L&D is going to keep up with the fast-paced, often reactive, and regulated world of the Life Sciences Industries. – VB

  • Allen, M. Leaving ADDIE for SAM: An Agile Model for Developing the Best Learning Experiences. ASTD, 2012.
  • Mitchinson, A & Morris, R. Learning Agility. Center for Creative Leadership white paper, 2014.
  • Satov, JML. “Agile by Fire”, Chief Learning Office, July/ August, 2020, p. 50.
Need to expedite a CAPA remediation project? |Looking for a facilitator/ quality systems project manager to align your SMEs for collaborative deliverables?

Who is the Author, Vivian Bringslimark?

(c) HPIS Consulting, Inc.

Are you worthy of your line partner’s trust?

As Performance Consultants (PCs) continue to demonstrate their character and competence, their line leaders begin to trust them more and more.

From those initial getting-to-you-know-you chats to requests for help discussions, the give trust and return trust has been reciprocated and continues to strengthen the relationship. With each request/opportunity, PCs are demonstrating their character traits and further developing their Human Performance Improvement (HPI) technical competence and experience.

Following the HPI/HPT model gives the PC the ability to articulate the big picture of how this request, this performance gap, this project, relates to organizational goals thus illustrating a strategic mindset. And by following the related methodology, PCs demonstrate strong project management skills while implementing changes systematically; not just a quick course to fix a perceived knowledge gap or motivation problem.

So PCs become worthy of receiving their partners’ trust.  Line partners in exchange merit their trust by giving it. Are you trustworthy as a Performance Consultant? Do you have the necessary competencies to tackle the additional performance solutions? Stay tuned for more blogs on what those competencies are and why they are so helpful for PCs.  -VB

References:
Covey,SR. The 8th Habit: From effectiveness to greatness, USA, Free Press, 2004.

Weiss, A. Organizational Consulting: How to be an effective internal change agent, USA, Wiley, 2003.

First, make “friends” with line management

 One of the best ways to establish a working relationship is to start with line management while you are waiting for your first HPI (Human Performance Improvement) project or during project downtimes.  Spend some time getting to know the folks you are most likely to be engaging with for a future project.

This blog has been merged with Wanted: Seeking a business partner with performance needs.

(c) HPIS Consulting, Inc.